Find Property

View Recent Sales

Our Blog

The Emotions of Turkey Hunting

As many of you outdoorsmen know, turkey hunting can be an emotional roller coaster ride. This is a story about a hunt that will reveal just that. On March 25, 2017, my girlfriend Hollan and I were out in the woods well before daylight. We had big expectations for the hunt that day. We were hoping to harvest her first turkey and we had also entered into the Lowndes County Turkey Rodeo.

I felt confident that we would have a good chance that morning because the afternoon before we went out to the piece of property that we were hunting and watched a pair of toms fly up to roost for the evening. We had planned out our attack the evening before and were in position well before the turkeys woke up that morning. As we waited for the first gobbles of the morning I kept my fingers crossed and just hoped that we would have a successful hunt. Hollan and I hunted many times together last year trying to harvest her first turkey and never could quite close the deal. On top of just trying to harvest her first turkey we had entered into a competition against 53 other teams in which I knew all were very capable of easily killing turkeys that morning.

The birds start chirping as the sun came up and turkeys started gobbling all throughout the country side but the Toms we had watched fly up to roost the evening before had not made a peep of noise yet. Hollan and I were both getting a little impatient waiting on these two Toms to get active. Finally, we couldn’t take it any longer and decided to go after another gobbler that was obviously very excited that morning. We tromped through the woods hoping to get close to him before a he gobbled up a hen and would be preoccupied for the rest of the day. As we approached the area we thought he was near we slowed down our speed walk, which was my exercise for the week, and began to try and pin point exactly where this gobbler was.

A few minutes went by and I began to think we had been cut off by a hen. Little did I know we were right on top of him. He gobbled and my adrenalin began to rush. I picked out a pined tree with some cover around it in a freshly burnt stand of pines looking down a fire lane and hen decoy I placed in the middle of the fire lane. I yelped a few times and he gobbled back. I knew he was close because I could start to hear him drumming. Hollan is set and ready and the next thing I know here he comes down the fire lane. He strutted all the way up to 15 yards and Hollan fires off a shot. She smoked him! The gobbler does a back flip and then all the sudden takes off running through the woods! We both fire off a few shots as he runs off but with no luck. I jump up and begin to chase him through the woods only to lose him in the brush.

When I get back to the scene of the shot where Hollan was she immediately began to get upset thinking she had missed the bird and that was the best chance we had at a turkey all day. I assured her that she had wounded the bird and that we should go look for him once more before moving on with our day. We were just about to call off the search when I heard a twig snap and looked to see that the gobbler had taken cover in a brush pile. That’s when the chase started again. He darted for a thicket and we were right behind him. We were able to catch up to him and finish him off. I looked at Hollan and had never experienced such an emotional adrenaline rush as I am not sure if she has quite like that either from the looks of her tears and the biggest smile you can possibly imagine.

Emotions ran from the lowest of the low to the highest of the high in just an instant and we were very excited not only because that was her first turkey but that she had a turkey to enter into the Lowndes County Turkey Rodeo! We arrived at lunch and socialized not really anxious about the results of the turkey rodeo because we were just excited about Hollan getting her first turkey! Finally, the time came for the result of the top three teams of the rodeo. Third place was announced and Hollan and I looked at each other with kind of the impression of oh well at least we got one this morning. Then second place winners were announced and the host called out our names! Hollan and I both weren’t very quick to jump because that was the last thing we expected! That was icing on the cake as some would say! We were able to harvest her first turkey and came in second place in the turkey rodeo! A hunt both of us will never forget I am sure of that!

-Hoke Smith

 

 

 

Read More
2740 Central Parkway - FOR SALE, PRICE REDUCED!

Beautiful 1-1/2 story office building located just off Vaughn Road convenient to downtown and east Montgomery. Built in 2000 this brick veneer building features 9’ to 10’ ceilings, solid wood four-panel doors, crown mold and chair rail in several areas, beautiful conference room, 3 restrooms and a kitchen/break room on the 2nd floor. This is an office condo with plenty of parking. There are 17 private offices, a reception area and several large open areas included.  

Read More
Montgomery County - 107 Acres +/- NEW!

IT’S WHAT EVERYBODY WANTS. APPROXIMATELY 107 ACRES THE MAJORITY OF WHICH IS IN MATURE OAKS AND HARDWOODS. A MOSSY LINED ENTRANCE ROAD LEADS TO A 1200 SQ FT BOARD AND BATTON CABIN WITH RAISED, WRAP AROUND PORCHES ON TWO SIDES. THE CABIN OVERLOOKS A STUNNING 13 ACRE LAKE WITH A BEAUTIFUL BOATHOUSE. THE PROPERTY IS SURROUNDED BY GREAT NEIGHBORS WHO MANAGE FOR WILDLIFE. THE AREA IS KNOWN FOR ITS TROPHY WHITETAIL AND LONGBEARDS AND THIS TRACT IS NO EXCEPTION. IDEAL FOR ENTERTAINING OR JUST GETTING AWAY FOR THE WEEKEND. THIS TRACT WILL NOT BE ON THE MARKET LONG. 

Read More
Autauga County, Alabama - Oak Springs Property 69 +/- acres - NEW

This a beautiful 69 +/- acre recreational and hunting property located in Autaugaville, Alabama. The property is located on CR 13 and is an easy drive from Prattville and Montgomery. The tract consists of 69 +/- acres of mixed timber and green fields. The majority of this timber is comprised of merchantable hardwoods; however there is also a nice stand of pines. There is a great road system and a firebreak that surrounds the entirety of the property. Some of the cosmetic appeal of this tract includes a small pond fed by an artesian well, 6 newly planted pecan trees (3 years old), 15 blueberry bushes and a plum tree. 

Read More
Make Wind Your Deer Hunting Friend

"The deer’s best defense against any predator is his nose. Many treestand hunters will tell you that although a deer may be able to see you, he may walk up, look straight at you and then walk on past, as if you don’t exist, if he doesn’t smell you. This same group of hunters may tell you of instances where they’ve shot more than one arrow at the same deer, and he’s never moved. But you rarely will find an instance when a deer has smelled a hunter and presented anything but a hindquarter shot. Often a deer may be able to see or hear you—but you still may be able to take your animal. However, if he smells you, I’ll lay odds that you’ll never get a shot." 

Read More
Montgomery County - 3335 Old Selma Road - Light Industrial Land NEW!

Montgomery County - 3335 Old Selma Road - Light Industrial Land NEW!

FOR SALE

Light Industrial Land
Montgomery, AL
ADDRESS: 3335 – 3347 Old Selma Road
SALE PRICE: $88,750 or $15,764 per acre
BUILDING SIZE: 4,320 sq. ft.
LOT SIZE: Total 5.63 acres on 2 parcels
ZONING: General Industry (M-3)
CURRENT USE: Vacant
CHARACTERISTICS: This property is a paragon shaped property located in the wedge between Old Selma Rd and Well Rd. It is suitable for light industrial purposes with plenty of land for expansion. At the price of only $15,764 per acre, it would be a very good buy for many uses such as self-storage, auto sales, warehouses, light manufacturing/assembly etc.

 


http://www.johnhallco.com/Default.aspx?CCID=18229&FID=100886&ExcludeBoolFalse=True&ID=/new-properties-search

 

Read More
Barbour County - 400 +/- acres - PRICE REDUCED, $1,900,000

Old Springhill Plantation

This historical plantation consists of 3,000 acres (400 acres fee simple and 2,600 acres on a long-term irrevocable hunting lease). Formerly operated as one of Alabama’s premier commercial hunting facilities since 1995, this beautiful land has abundant deer, turkey, dove and quail populations and excellent wildlife habitat. It is easily accessible being 45 miles from Montgomery, 38 miles from Auburn and 48 miles from Columbus, GA.


This land is part of a large 1841 plantation owned by Braxton Bragg Comer who was Governor of Alabama from 1907 to 1911. Before becoming Governor of Alabama, B.B. Comer was a leading industrialist, establishing a large cotton manufacturing company known as Avondale Mills of Birmingham in 1897.

The antebellum mansion, built in 1841, rests in a pecan orchard and features 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, modern kitchen, fireplaces, 16 ft. ceilings and beautiful heart pine floors. A new roof was installed in 2009. Adding to the ambience of “stepping back in time”, there are 3 restored tenant houses, 5 barns, the first cotton gin in Alabama, a century old baptismal, and a slave cemetery on the property.

There are too many amenities to name but some important ones are as follows:
• Four lakes – 6 acres, 12 acres, 15 acres and 85 acres. All but one have covered pavilions and trophy bass and bream are plentiful.
• A 16 year old fully furnished 8000 square foot lodge. It includes a large gathering room with fireplace, meeting room, 7 bedrooms with private baths, commercial kitchen, large dining room, an office and a pro shop.
• A 30 KW diesel generator goes with the lodge.
• 3 bedrooms, 2 bath home for manager and small house for employee.
• 750 square foot kitchen and meat processing room with walk-in cooler.
• Large BBQ pit with adjoining covered picnic facility.
• Kennels for up to 30 bird dogs.
• Miles of excellent internal roads.
• 50 foot tower for continental pheasant shoots.
• Horse barn with 3 large fenced pastures (one has electric fences).
• Vehicles, tractors, boats, ATV’s, farm implements and tools valued in excess of $100,000.

 

 

 

Read More
Common Errors When Evaluating Timber Markets

"We all come to the table with biases and preconceptions when considering investments. If we are new to timber, we may think of spotted owls or Paul Bunyan before recognizing that the industry comprises, for the most part, experienced individuals who love forest resources. That said, folks make mistakes when making decisions. Common errors and sources of resistance when confronting the facts include:

  • Failing to consider the view from the other side of the table.
  • Imposing rigid projections for the economy. 
  • Forgetting to test opinions and data sources. 
  • Creating goals via fiat rather than by analysis.

At the end of the day, be systematic when collecting the facts and organizing them in ways that bring to the forefront an understanding of how things work before investing timber."

By:

To read the full article at Landthink CLICK HERE


 

Read More

Find Property

View Recent Sales